Joint Pain/Arthralgia Indication

Joint Pain/Arthralgia Indication
Joint pain is discomfort that arises from any joint – the point where two or more bones meet. Arthralgia (from the Greek arthro-, joint + -algos, pain) literally means joint pain; it is a symptom of injury, infection, illnesses (in particular arthritis), or an allergic reaction to medication. Joint pain can be mild, appearing as soreness each time the joint is moved. Alternatively, severe joint pain can make use of the joint impossible.

Many different conditions can lead to painful joints, including osteoarthritis (a degenerative and destructive process), rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, bursitis (inflammation of tissues surrounding the joints), rheumatic fever, Lyme disease, gout, strains, sprains, and other injuries (e.g., from sports). Joint pain is extremely common. In one national survey, about one-third of adults reported having joint pain within the past 30 days. Knee pain was the most common complaint, followed by shoulder and hip pain, but joint pain can affect any part of the body, from the ankles and feet to the shoulders and hands. As people age, painful joints become increasingly more common.